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Body language

In my career, I have learned how important the body language is in photojournalism. This week, this lesson has been confirmed.

US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley greets the South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir in a meeting in Juba on October 25, 2017. Photo by Albert Gonzalez Farran / AFP
US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley greets the South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir in a meeting in Juba on October 25, 2017. Photo by Albert Gonzalez Farran / AFP

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir is standing alone in a large meeting room of his office, exposed to cameras and a group of journalists, some of who are asking him inquisitorial questions.

After about thirty seconds that seemed long and likely deliberate, his guest, the United States ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, one of the most important figures in the Donald Trump administration, finally arrives. And she was walking quickly, with firm decision, with an evident self-confidence, extending smiling her hand with a touch of supremacy not very obvious in order to not to break the diplomatic protocol. And she was nearly dominating the President, who was still in a waiting position.

The journalists do not know what happened and what was said in the meeting between these two important politicians. But the language of their bodies explained some things. A language that was photographed for the public opinion, which surely drew its own conclusions.

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